Using satellite communications to comply with EU fishing regulations

A change in EU regulations in July this year means all fishing vessels of more than 24 metres in length are now required to record and transmit daily activity reports of catch, transshipments, landings and sales electronically to fishing authorities.  This requires a communication system which is reliable, easy to use and install but most of all cost-effective.  Inmarsat’s FleetBroadband 150 terminal ticks all these boxes with simultaneous voice and data capabilities with data transmission achieving rates of up to 150 kbps.  The terminal can also send and receive SMS and provides global coverage excluding the poles.  An important feature to mention is that the Inmarsat network is not affected by weather making it a reliable choice for fishing vessels.

Inmarsat FleetBroadband Sailor 150

Thrane & Thrane Sailor 150 for use with Inmarsat's FleetBroadband Service

The antenna is contained in a 29cm diameter radome which weighs between only 2 kg so finding a spot for it on your vessel couldn’t be easier.  The FleetBroadband 150 is part of a three-model range, with the FB 250 and FB 500 completing the FleetBroadband series, the latter two offering even higher data speeds of up to 432 kbps and the added feature of Streaming IP.  Manufactured by Thrane & Thrane, the FB 150 comes with a 2 year warranty and has been granted an Ingress Protection rating of IPX6 which means the equipment has been tested and complied to be protected against heavy seas – the equipment has withstood water projected at all angles through a 12.5mm nozzle at a flow rate of 100 litres/min at a pressure of 100kN/m2 for 3 minutes from a distance of 3 meters.

The cost of the FB 150 system is £4,150 ex VAT.  This includes the antenna, terminal, SIM card, handset, power cable and 10m antenna cable. After the $25.00 activation fee, there is no monthly airtime contract, and there is no minimum term; all that is required is one month’s notice.  Airtime charges are as follows:

  • Voice calls to fixed line cost $1.30 per minute
  • Voicemail costs $1.10 per minute
  • Data costs $11.50 per MB
  • Text messaging costs $0.75 per SMS
  • Free to receive all calls and SMS

Not only can the FleetBroadband system be used to comply with EU regulations but also for a number of other useful services:

  •  Telephony, email, internet access
  • Real-time weather from Météo France using SkyFile Weather
  • Downloading latest fish prices
  • Reporting and selling catch online
  • Fish finding
  • Position reporting
  • Depth maps
  • Updating electronic logs
  • Crew communications

In July 2011 fishing vessels over 15m will also be required to comply so now is the time to start planning and investing in a system which will comply with the regulations.  Contact Global Telesat Communications for more information.

Satellite Internet Access Using Satellite Terminals

If you’re looking to purchase a satellite broadband terminal but don’t know where to start, our blog is here to help.  There are many factors to take into account when considering a satellite terminal.

 

The main use of a satellite terminal is to allow connection to the internet at broadband speeds from virtually anywhere in the world.  As most terminals are no larger than a laptop they can be transported easily and are therefore ideal for people requiring internet connectivity while travelling in remote locations. Some terminals offer voice capability through a telephone handset which means they can also be used to make satellite phone calls.

 

There are two main networks to choose from when considering a satellite terminal; Inmarsat BGAN and Thuraya. Most terminals currently available work on the near-global Inmarsat BGAN network and offer data rates of between 384 kbps to 492 kbps. Some terminals, such as the Thrane & Thrane Explorer 700, allow simultaneous multi-user access to the internet but most users will find the Thrane & Thrane 300 or Wideye Sabre 1 BGAN terminals more than adequate as they are small, light and cheaper than the multi-user models.

 

The Inmarsat BGAN network covers everywhere in the world from 72 degrees north to 72 degrees south. This means that the only place the network is not available is in the poles. If you are interested in purchasing a BGAN terminal please look at our Inmarsat BGAN terminal page to see the range of Inmarsat BGAN terminals currently available.

 

Inmarsat BGAN Explorer 700 Satellite Terminal

Inmarsat BGAN Explorer 700 Satellite Terminal

 

The alternative network to consider is Thuraya. Thuraya offer just one terminal, the Thuraya IP, which is a small and light terminal capable of a data rate of up to 444 kbps. The Thuraya network covers two thirds of the globe consisting of most of Europe, Africa, the Middle East, Asia and Australasia. If you are interested in purchasing a Thuraya terminal please look at our Thuraya terminal page to see more information on the Thuraya IP terminal.

 

If you’re still not sure about the Inmarsat and Thuraya coverage why not have a look at our coverage page to double check that the Inmarsat or Thuraya terminal will work where you are going.

 

Once you have chosen the satellite broadband terminal most suitable for your requirements you will need to buy airtime to use with the terminal. If you do not need global coverage and will be travelling within the Thuraya network coverage area you may find that some of their airtime options can work out better value for money than BGAN. Thuraya offer post-paid plans which include a set amount of data that you can transfer each month without incurring any additional charge. Once this amount is exceeded you will be charged at a standard rate for your usage.

 

If you need to use your terminal outside the Thuraya network area then an Inmarsat BGAN terminal is the best option for you. Although this can work out a little bit more expensive in some situations, you will have the peace of mind knowing that, unlike Thuraya IP, the terminal offers near-global coverage. With BGAN you have the option of buying post-paid or pre-paid airtime. Post-paid airtime involves a monthly fee and a minimum contract term and is suitable for someone who is going to use an unknown amount of airtime over a long period of time. Prepaid airtime is more suitable for short term users who know in advance the rough amount of data they will be transferring. Once this data has been transferred you will not be able to use your terminal until you top it up with extra credit.

 

Once you have made a decision on what you think best suits your needs then why not get in contact with us to ask any final questions.